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Teaching and Learning the Lessons of History: The Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History

Quick Overview

We are always “On Patrol” looking for a place to take our kids and grand kids. It must be family friendly, which for us means there is something of interest for all ages. The Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History in Frankfort, Kentucky fits the bill. The permanent exhibit titled “A Kentucky Journey” is a great walk through our early history up until the present day. The exhibits are interactive and at eye level for children seven or eight years and older. It is filled with rare and authentic artifacts that reflect the strengths and talents of our ancestors. Many of the objects are in drawers so you have easy access for viewing.


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Full Article:

We are always “On Patrol” looking for a place to take our kids and grandkids. It must be family friendly, which for us means there is something of interest for all ages. The Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History in Frankfort, Kentucky fits the bill. The permanent exhibit titled “A Kentucky Journey” is a great walk through our early history up until the present day. The exhibits are interactive and at eye level for children seven or eight years and older. It is filled with rare and authentic artifacts that reflect the strengths and talents of our ancestors. Many of the objects are in drawers so you have easy access for viewing.

 

You can listen to a recording of Bill Monroe and the Bluegrass Boys play their brand of traditional Bluegrass music or to speeches by Kentucky orators and early leaders like Henry Watterson. You can see Lincoln’s pocket watch, chain and fob; an original John James Audubon print, and a mahogany box used as Kentucky’s first treasury. You won’t soon forget the metal cast of Daniel Boone’s skull that was made when his body was moved 25 years after his death in 1845 from Missouri to Kentucky. You will be surprised to learn that Simon Kenton was equal to Daniel Boone as a skilled woodsman and that Louisville held a World’s Fair in 1883 called the Southern Exposition. The burial mounds and rich ceremonial life of our prehistoric relatives struck me.

 

Scattered throughout exhibit and beautifully displayed are Kentucky quilts. You can see a Star of Bethlehem Quilt made in 1855 of silk and glass beads, a Tumbling Block made in 1860 of scrap cotton fabric, and a Funeral Ribbon Memorial Quilt in 1982 consisting of ribbons from flower arrangements given by family and friends.

 

In addition to “A Kentucky Journey”, you can visit the Keeneland Changing Exhibits Gallery, The Hall of Kentucky Governors, and the Martin F. Schmidt Research Library. Special events include Family History Workshops and concerts. Members have access to the entire Kentucky Historical Society history campus and because KHS is part of the Time Travelers network, you are eligible for special discounts at historical institutions across the country. There is no food available within the building, but just across the street is a Rebecca Ruth Candy Store. The walk is worth it for the smell of the fresh candy alone. Museum prices are Adult $4.00 Youth 6-12 $2.00. 100 W. Broadway Frankfort, KY 40601 502-564-2301

 

Where are your favorite historical sites to take your children and grandchildren? Tell us about a special place you use to teach or learn the lessons of history…

 

Website: www.history.ky.gov

 

May 7, 2013

 



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